I Keep Under the Body

I Keep Under the Body
Compiled by Georead

The Bible defines the body as something that is to be brought into subjection.

1 Corinthians 9:27  But I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.

Some say that the body of itself can do nothing but if so what need would there be to bring it into subjection?

 The body is to be brought into subjection to what?

 1) The body is to be brought into subjection to the noble powers of the mind.

And as they more fully understand the human body, the wonderful work of God’s hand, formed in the image of the Divine, they will seek to bring their bodies into subjection to the noble powers of the mind. {RH, September 12, 1871 par. 9}

2) The body is to be brought into subjection to the higher powers of the mind.

The body is to be brought into subjection. The higher powers of the being are to rule. The passions are to be controlled by the will, which is itself to be under the control of God. The kingly power of reason, sanctified by divine grace, is to bear sway in our lives. {CD 73.6}

The heaven-entrusted faculties of the mind are to be treated as the higher powers, to rule the kingdom of the body. The natural appetites and passions are to be brought under the control of the conscience and the spiritual powers.  {8T 63.2}

The word “body” in 1 Corinthians 9:27 refers to the physical nature which has tendencies to be kept in subjection. If not in subjection to the higher powers of the mind the tendencies of the physical nature will work ruin and death.

The tendencies of the physical nature, unless under the dominion of a higher power, will surely work ruin and death. The body is to be brought into subjection to the higher powers of the being. {2MCP 406.4}

 The word “body” in 1 Corinthians 9:27 encompasses the lower nature which has appetites and passions to be kept in subjection.

They must take up the warfare against these sinful practices, deny appetite, and keep the lower nature in subjection. Said the great apostle, “I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.”  {RH, February 21, 1888 par. 8}

It is impossible for you to increase in spiritual strength while your appetite and passions are not under perfect control. Says the inspired apostle: “I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.” {2T 413.2}

The words, “I keep under my body,” literally mean to beat back by severe discipline the desires, impulses, and passions.  {AA 314.1}

The body should be in subjection to the mind (the moral and intellectual powers) but the mind should not be in subjection to the body.

The appetite should ever be in subjection to the moral and intellectual powers. The body should be servant to the mind, and not the mind to the body.  {CG 398.3}

Man was created with appetites and passion under the control of reason.

Man was to bear God’s image, both in outward resemblance and in character. Christ alone is “the express image” (Hebrews 1:3) of the Father; but man was formed in the likeness of God. His nature was in harmony with the will of God. His mind was capable of comprehending divine things. His affections were pure; his appetites and passions were under the control of reason. He was holy and happy in bearing the image of God and in perfect obedience to His will.  {PP 45.2}

When sin came in man’s appetites and passions were perverted.

He lost his moral uprightness and his physical perfection. The appetites and passions that were given to him as blessings were perverted, and became warring lusts, the ministers of death. And so man passed under the dominion of the grave. Sin is the cause of physical degeneration; sin has blighted the race, and introduced disease, misery, and death.  {PHJ, February 1, 1902 par. 3}

Christ exercised self-control over appetite and passion. Christ resisted temptation within and never sinned

From the time of Adam to that of Christ, self-indulgence had increased the power of the appetites and passions, until they had almost unlimited control. Thus men had become debased and diseased, and of themselves it was impossible for them to overcome. In man’s behalf, Christ conquered by enduring the severest test. For our sake He exercised a self-control stronger than hunger or death. And in this first victory were involved other issues that enter into all our conflicts with the powers of darkness.  {DA 117.4}

After His baptism the Son of God entered the dreary wilderness, there to be tempted by the devil. For nearly six weeks He endured the agonies of hunger. . . . He realized the power of appetite upon man; and in behalf of sinful man, He bore the closest test possible upon that point. Here a victory was gained which few can appreciate. The controlling power of depraved appetite and the grievous sin of indulging it can only be understood by the length of the fast which our Saviour endured that He might break its power. . . .  {HP 194.2}

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